9 The English countryside, events and quests – more crops, decorations and farm space

The English countryside in farmville that you can start farming in at level 20 is zynga’s reaction to the continuing trend of players creating additional accounts under different names to start the game over again and recapture the thrill of starting out at the game while using their experience of the game to create farms the way they know works well. In addition to that, even before frontierville was released in 2010, there have been calls by players for quests and more “action” in farmville. While other players want to continue playing farmville the way they are used to, this is actually the way to cater for both audiences (if they indeed are that different). The English countryside offers the chance to begin a new farm while keeping your old farm on the same account and people who aren’t interested in the quests can continue playing their accounts the way they feel is best without being continuously harassed to do new tasks. On the other hand you get good rewards for doing the quests, sometimes you can receive unique items or free farmcash that way and some of the quests will give you farm buildings to help you develop your English farm faster. And if you want to get ahead fast, the English countryside can put you on the fast track there as well since you can keep running both your farms at the same time to make twice as much money and XP at the same time.

Since there are only few crops on the new farm yet and you can theoretically grow a lot you can grow there also on your main farm (by unlocking the visible crops at the market on your home farm with bushels), I have started building more and more orchards on the English farm, since the profitable trees are better than growing crops to earn money anyway and I also use the English countryside to master limited crops while I do regular masteries at the home farm.

Since you get a lot of the buildings at the English countryside farm from quests, such as the garage, a chicken coop, your crafting building the pub and a dairy farm, all you need to buy there are some additional dairies and the sheep pen when the quests require you to do so. Constructing buildings before the quests give them to you for free like the chicken coop will not give you an additional building when you finish the quest, so don’t cheat yourself out of the quest rewards by building things that aren’t asked for. Since there are already a lot of guides on the quests I’ll just say that it’s no problem if you don’t read those, they aren’t exceptionally difficult to achieve and few of the things they require can be done in advance, so my approach to them has been to wait for the quests and not take the fun out of them by reading ahead. If you want to read about the tasks, there is a good visual guide on the official forum http://forums.zynga.com/showthread.php?t=985719 and on most of the fan pages that I know. At the moment I still enjoy the slightly different look of the English countryside farm and wait for new quests to be opened. You don’t need to rush through the quests unless that’s what you like, just do them when the timing suits you.

For some of the quests expansions are required but so far there aren’t any that ask for the FC-only 26×26 English Expanse and 28×28 English Domain expansions. When they do I suppose those will already be available for coins, so I haven’t bought them with Farmcash. In order to expand your farm in the English countryside, you need help by friends to survey the land. There aren’t any neighbor requirements though. You need 2 surveyors for the English Homestead (14×14), 6 for the English Family Farm (16×16), 9 for the Freehold (18×18), 12 for the English Plantation (20×20), 15 for the English Holding (22×22) and 20 for the English Estate (24×24). If you pay Farmcash for the expansions you don’t need your friends as surveyors, so there are no requirements for the largest FC-only expansions yet, except that you pay 100 or 140 Farmcash. You will also notice that the coin and cash prices for expansions in the English countryside is slightly higher than at your home farm so it makes sense to get the expansions for your home farm before you buy the same size at more cost in the English countryside. The 20×20 expansion makes this most striking: at your home farm you need 16 neighbors for that but only 75,000 coins or 20 Farmcash. In the English countryside you need 15 surveyors and 200,000 coins or 50 Farmcash.

Since there are also new crops for the English countryside and mastering them doesn’t really take long, you may be wondering which ones are the most profitable. At the moment they aren’t included in the farmville planner that I use, but you can find information on them on the farmville wikis.

The most profitable crops in the English countryside are King Edward potatoes, which comes as a bit of a surprise, since they are also the crops that take the longest time to grow, 2 days. They will get you 7,6 coins per hour but not too many XP. Next up is royal hops at 7,5 coins per hour and it only grows for 10 hours. Field beans and turnips that both take 16 hours to become ripe give you 7,2 coins per hour. Foxglove, a 12-hour flower, is also 7,2 coins an hour. Radishes take 18 hours to grow and you earn 6,9 coins an hour. Barley, bluebells and English peas take 12 hours to grow and give you 6,3 coins per hour. Black tea only gets you 5,6 coins an hour but since you need it for some of the pub recipes and it is the only crop for 8 hours at the moment, it makes sense to plant sometimes. Hops give you only 5,5 coins, so I usually plant them together with royal hops that takes the same 10 hours and gives me better profit. I only make sure to plant just enough to give me regular hops bushels to open my market stall, 32 plots are usually enough (and only 2 clicks with the combine). Spring squill give you less money and XP than the other 12 hour crops, so they only make sense to plant in a small area as well to open the market stall and get a few bushels for your flower scones recipe. Red currant and English roses aren’t that profitable at 5 and 4,2 coins an hour. But since they are also the only short-term crops for 4 and 6 hours they will make sense to plant for that period of time when you can’t plant longer-growing crops while you wait for a neighbor to start a co-op or before you plant some 16 or 18 hour crops for the night. Pink asters and cornflowers are the least profitable crops in the English countryside at 2,8 and 2,2 coins an hour. Pink asters are required for several recipes and one co-op that you need to participate in to pass a quest. The same is true for the cornflowers but they are only in one of the pub recipes right now. I’ve only planted them to master them and get collectibles for the flower collection at the same time.

10 Breeding – the principle and the perks

© Conny Streit, 2011

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About lcr1tter

I have created this site to share my thoughts and insights about fun activities like browser games. I was not sponsored or influenced by companies who created the games but stated my honest opinions and created my own texts and videos here. I'm going to publish a few graphic short stories that have been in my head for a few months now. I hope I can get them to come out and show themselves. ;-)
This entry was posted in FarmVille, FarmVille Guide, Farmville Guide II: How to get to level 85 in less than 3 months and have fun playing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to 9 The English countryside, events and quests – more crops, decorations and farm space

  1. I wanted to thank you for this great read!!
    I absolutely enjoyed every little bit of it. I have you book-marked to check out new things
    you post…

    • lcr1tter says:

      Thank you :) It is unlikely that I’ll post anything on farmville any time soon though. But I’m thinking of writing a short guide on another game that I play now and I’m working on a webcomic.

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